<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Jan 3, 2010 at 7:48 AM,  <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:webmaster@vbplusme.com">webmaster@vbplusme.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Hello Eddie,<br>
<div class="im"><br>
Sunday, January 3, 2010, 3:25:22 PM, you wrote:<br>
<br>
&gt; The primary difference between a variable and a constant is<br>
&gt; mutability.  If your database authorization details are not going to<br>
&gt; change, make them constants.  If your database details DO change<br>
&gt; throughout the execution of a script, make them variables.  In regards<br>
&gt; to the performance of constants in PHP, that&#39;s an incredibly minor<br>
&gt; improvement (a microoptimization, really) and it&#39;s my opinion that you<br>
&gt; ought to be writing software to be good code and not have to hack<br>
&gt; around considerations like how many microseconds your database<br>
&gt; username declaration takes.[...]<br></div></blockquote><div><br>Though you might also want to consider loading the values from a config file, which is easy to change when you move your app from place to place, e.g., from development to production.<br>
<br>Zend_Config makes this especially easy. You set a default configuration environment and define other flavors that inherit from it. <a href="http://framework.zend.com/manual/en/zend.config.html">http://framework.zend.com/manual/en/zend.config.html</a> <br>
</div></div><br>-- <br>Support real health care reform: <br><a href="http://phimg.org/">http://phimg.org/</a><br><br>--<br>David Mintz<br><a href="http://davidmintz.org/">http://davidmintz.org/</a><br><br><br>